Applications of Quantum Dots (QD) in Medicine

*Neelima Dandamudi
Department Of Pharmaceutical Analysis And Quality Assurance, Annamacharya College Of Pharmacy, JNT University, Anantapur, India

*Corresponding Author:
Neelima Dandamudi
Department Of Pharmaceutical Analysis And Quality Assurance, Annamacharya College Of Pharmacy, JNT University, Anantapur, India
Email:neelimadandamudi@gmail.com

Published on: 2021-08-27

Abstract

Quantum dots (QDs) are one of the most significant materials that produce a ground between nanotechnology, and medicine assay. Their unique photoluminescence and electronic properties include broad and continuous absorption spectra, thin emission spectra from visible to near-infrared wavelengths, long light lasting, high brightness makes them some capable probe materials in biosensing or immunosensing platform [1]. They are considered effective fluorescent markers used in a drug delivery system for covering the metabolism process of drugs in the body owing to their special physicochemical characteristics. They can also be developed for a variety of biomedical operations, such as complaint discovery, and fluorescent assays for medicine discovery [1].

Keywords

Quantum Dots, Fluorescent Labels, Medicine

Quantum Dots in Medicine

QDs are reasonable candidates as theranostic platforms, as they can act as the main nanocarrier or be part of a more complex architecture as the fluorescent labels [2]. Presently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical, and nuclear imaging have been immense as crucial imaging ways in biological systems [3]. They vary substantially in terms of sensitivity, resolution, complexity, acquisition time, and functional cost. Still, these above-mentioned ways are reciprocal to each other [4]. A significant amount of research is aimed at using the unique optical properties of QDs in biological imaging. Important of optic bioimaging is grounded on traditional colorings.

Paclitaxel (PTX), an extensively conceded medicine choice for the treatment of colorful mortal cancers, along with CdTe@CdS@ZnS QDs were co-loaded in nanostructured lipid carriers to have a theranostic approach in cancer remedy [2]. Doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto pH-responsive ZnO QDs. They synthesized ultrasmall QDs (3 nm) functionalized with poly (ethylene glycol) (Cut) and hyaluronic acid to target the overexpressed glycoprotein CD44 in cancer cells and DOX as the model medicine for the study.

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