Antimicrobial Resistance along the Food Chain: Contaminated and Industrially Processed Nutrients

*Aaron Lerner
Chaim Sheba Medical Center, The Zabludowicz Research Center For Autoimmune Diseases, Hashomer, Israel

*Corresponding Author:
Aaron Lerner
Chaim Sheba Medical Center, The Zabludowicz Research Center For Autoimmune Diseases, Hashomer, Israel
Email:aaronlerner1948@gmail.com

Published on: 2022-02-17

Abstract

The presence of antibiotics-resistant microorganisms became a universal challenge to prevent and treat human disease propagation through zoonotic, food components and industrial processed food transmissions. The rising prevalence of morbidity and mortality associated with over and inappropriate use of antibiotics induced global efforts to anticipate this worldwide health security threat. Much of the theme is centered along the food chain, starting with the microbial and antibiotics contaminated environment, misusage of antibiotics in agricultural farms and plantations, through hospitals and clinics. The present narrative review updates on the antibiotic resistance gene transfer in ready to use industrial nutrients and in contaminated food products. A more promising and hopefully rewarding aspect, in the current review, expands on the natural antimicrobial components that contribute to the suppression of antibacterial resistance in various types of microorganisms. Food transferred bacterial antibiotic resistance should be taken in account in the national and international efforts to anticipate this global health security threat.

Keywords

Antimicrobial Resistance; Antibiotics Resistance Gene; Food Chain; Antimicrobial Activity; Horizontal Gene Transfer; Multidrug Resistance; Mobile Genetic Elements; Bacteria; Microbe; Food

Introduction

Antibiotics are present since their early medical introduction in the 1940s. For more than the last 8 decades, their consumption and often their inappropriate use have substantially increased. It is estimated that antibiotic resistance kills around 23,000 people per year with an economic burden of over $20 billion in additional expenses, in the United States [1]. The rising prevalence of morbidity and mortality associated with over and inappropriate use of antibiotics provoked national and international steps to anticipate this global health security threat.

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