A New Standpoint of Daughters’ Health Behaviors in Single Mother Headed Households

*Jaewon Lee
Department Of Social Welfare, Inha University, Korea, Republic Of

*Corresponding Author:
Jaewon Lee
Department Of Social Welfare, Inha University, Korea, Republic Of
Email:j343@inha.ac.kr

Published on: 2021-02-03

Abstract

Health behaviors refer to a variety of activities related to one’s health, such as cigarette smoking, substance use, diet, and physical activities. There are gender differences between men and women for certain health behaviors. For instance, women are less likely to engage in physical activities while men are more likely to engage in cigarette smoking and other substance use.

Keywords

Women’s Health; Single Mothers; Daughters Behavior

Women’s Health Behaviors and A New Standpoint

Health behaviors refer to a variety of activities related to one’s health, such as cigarette smoking, substance use, diet, and physical activities. There are gender differences between men and women for certain health behaviors. For instance, women are less likely to engage in physical activities while men are more likely to engage in cigarette smoking and other substance use [1-5]. In addition, there has been a large body of studies identifying what factors influence women’s health behaviors [6-8]. However, little is known about the intergenerational transmission of mothers’ socioeconomic status (SES) to their daughters’ health behaviors. In particular, single mothers are less likely to have the economic resources to support their children’s healthy behaviors compared to mothers in two-parent households [9]. Thus, it is important to deeply consider the role of single mothers’ SES on their daughters’ health behaviors.
According to attachment theory, children build a close relationship with their mother or other primary caregivers from infancy to early adulthood [10]. Particularly, girls may be more highly attached to their mothers than boys, so that girls are more likely to be affected by mothers’ influences and to mutually interact with their mothers [11,12]. The close relationship between daughters and mothers influences girls’ healthy behaviors, such as food consumption [13]. For example, girls with mothers who are in poverty and therefore struggle to buy healthy foods might not develop healthy eating habits, while women who grow up with mothers who exercise on a regular basis may be more likely to exercise as well as they imitate their mother’s behaviors [12,14]. In other words, simply identifying individual factors or personal characteristics within women themselves might not explain their healthy behaviors. Therefore, it is necessary to account for the intergenerational transmission of mother’s SES or daily behaviors to understand daughters’ healthy behaviors.

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