Role of Bacterial Biofilm in Resistant Cases of Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Otitis externa

*Ibrahim ELdsoky
Department Of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty Of Medicine, Alazhar University, Egypt

*Corresponding Author:
Ibrahim ELdsoky
Department Of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty Of Medicine, Alazhar University, Egypt
Email:eldsokyibrahim089@gmail.com

Published on: 2020-01-03

Abstract

Bacterial biofilms consist of a complex, organized community of bacteria that anchor to both biotic and abiotic surfaces. They are composed of layers of embedded, live bacteria within extruded ex-polymeric matrix. This configuration allows for evasion of host defenses and decreased susceptibility to antibiotic therapy while maintaining the ability to deliberately release planktonic bacteria, resulting in recurrent acute infections. Thus, bacterial biofilms were hypothesized to contribute to the progression and persistence of chronic rhinosinusitis and otitis externa.

Keywords

Biofilm; Chronic Rhinosinusitis; Otitis Externa

Introduction

Biofilm is a three-dimensionally structured, specialized community of adherent microorganisms surrounded by an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). Biofilm communities in most environments, including human disease, tend to be polymicrobial. By including multiple bacterial and/or fungal species in a single community, biofilms obtain numerous advantages, such as passive resistance, metabolic cooperation, by-product influence, quorum sensing systems, an enlarged gene pool with more efficient DNA sharing, and many other synergies, which give them a competitive advantage. In general, the greater the diversity, the more robust the biofilm is in terms of its survivability [1].

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